Thoughts on Mammon

Below are two lists based on the IMF List 2018 - 2021 of debtor and creditor nations by Net international investment position.

What it does is take the total external financial assets (Cash, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and bank deposits) by a country's legal residents, then subtracts the total external liabilities, both public and private.
In the US, their latest report in December 2020 showed assets totalling $32.16 trillion, and liabilities $46.25 trillion, a nett figure in the red of $14.09 trillion.

1. The 28 creditor nations listed in US$ are

  1. Japan on $3.721 trillion in 2020
  2. Germany on $2.870 trillion in 2020
  3. China on $2.154 trillion in 2020
  4. Hong Kong on $1.942 trillion in 2020
  5. Taiwan on $1.343 trillion in 2019
  6. Netherlands on $1.047 trillion in 2020
  7. Norway on $1.008 trillion in 2020
  8. Singapore on $937 billion in 2020
  9. Canada on $877 billion in 2020
  10. Switzerland on $728 billion in 2020
  11. Saudi Arabia on $625 billion in 2020
  12. Russia on $557 billion in 2020
  13. South Korea on $440 billion in 2020
  14. Belgium on $243 billion in 2020
  15. Denmark on $233 billion in 2020
  16. Israel on $188 billion in 2020
  17. Argentina on $121 billion in 2020
  18. South Africa on $116 billion in 2020
  19. Kuwait on $94 billion in 2019
  20. Sweden on $90 billion in 2020
  21. Thailand on $80 billion in 2020
  22. Austria on $50 billion in 2020
  23. Luxembourg on $38 billion in 2020
  24. Uzbekistan on $22 billion in 2020
  25. Malaysia on $20 billion in 2020
  26. Malta on $9 billion in 2020
  27. Iceland on $7 billion in 2020
  28. Italy on $4 billion in 2020

Totalling $ trillion


2. The 53 debtor nations listed in US$ are

  1. USA on $14.092 trillion in 2020
  2. Spain on $1.060 trillion in 2020
  3. Australia on $729 billion in 2020
  4. Ireland on $706 billion in 2020
  5. France on $699 billion in 2020
  6. United Kingdom on $668 billion in 2020
  7. Mexico on $524 billion in 2020
  8. Turkey on $403 billion in 2020
  9. Brazil on $403 billion in 2020
  10. India on $379 billion in 2021
  11. Greece on $335 billion in 2020
  12. Poland on $267 billion in 2020
  13. Indonesia on $265 billion in 2020
  14. Portugal on $243 billion in 2020
  15. Egypt on $194 billion in 2020
  16. Colombia on $164 billion in 2020
  17. Pakistan on $120 billion in 2020
  18. New Zealand on $117 billion in 2020
  19. Romania on $115 billion in 2020
  20. Peru on $86 billion in 2020
  21. Sudan on $85 billion in 2018
  22. Nigeria on $73 billion in 2019
  23. Slovakia on $71 billion in 2020
  24. Panama on $68 billion in 2020
  25. Kazakhstan on $65 billion in 2020
  26. Tunisia on $64 billion in 2019
  27. Mozambique on $59 billion in 2020
  28. Hungary on $59 billion in 2020
  29. Serbia on $49 billion in 2020
  30. Bangladesh on $43 billion in 2020
  31. Mongolia on $37 billion in 2020
  32. Chile on $35 billion in 2020
  33. Cyprus on $32 billion in 2020
  34. Belarus on $30 billion in 2020
  35. Croatia on $29 billion in 2020
  36. Zambia on $28 billion in 2020
  37. Czech Republic on $28 billion in 2020
  38. Cambodia on $21 billion in 2020
  39. Ukraine on $21 billion in 2020
  40. Republic of Congo on $20 billion in 2018
  41. Bulgaria on $19 billion in 2020
  42. Uganda on $19 billion in 2019
  43. Nicaragua on $15 billion in 2020
  44. Latvia on $14 billion in 2020
  45. Armenia on $10 billion in 2020
  46. Lithuania on $10 billion in 2020
  47. Slovenia on $9 billion in 2020
  48. Montenegro on $9 billion in 2018
  49. Albania on $8 billion in 2020
  50. Finland on $6 billion in 2020
  51. Estonia on $6 billion in 2020
  52. Philippines on $5 billion in 2020
  53. Bhutan on $3 billion in 2019

Totalling $ trillion

Note the discrepancy of $3.055 trillion between dollars invested (mostly in the US) by creditor nations, and dollars in debt by debtor nations, can be (at least partially) accounted for by the different accounting systems in place. Secrets.

Regarding Australia's debtor nation status in third position, ever since we were first settled we've relied on other countries to invest in us to help us get going. And our public service has always been somewhat top heavy.
See a recent chart below for how much we are individually and corporately in debt to "managed funds" (in Australia as well as overseas).

Mammon and Babylon — Matthew 6:19-24   Luke 16:1-13   Revelation 17:1-5   Zechariah 5:1-11

Revelation 17:5 And upon her forehead was a name written, MYSTERY, BABYLON THE GREAT, THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS AND ABOMINATIONS (foul stenches) OF THE EARTH.

Click here re the Four Horsemen, Simon the Pharisee, Judas, and Paul's attitude to taking up a collection.

Click here re the History of Money and click here re the History of Inflation.

On May 28, 2014 6:49 PM, "Stephen Williamson" wrote:

Subject: Chatting about mammon - the great "mamma" this morning :-)

Ok Australia's Federal Net debt in bonds is now about $270 billion
$492 billion in June 2020

Total State and Territory debt in bonds about $230 billion
Private company debt in bonds about $720 billion
So, bonds investment: $1.22 trillion

Total private housing debt about $870 billion
Total investment housing debt about $410 billion
So, housing: $1.28 trillion

Private credit card debt and personal borrowings $140 billion
Private company borrowings from banks, etc about $730 billion
So, other borrowings: .87 trillion

Total Australian Debt $3.37 trillion, roughly, in May 2013 click here

So who is in the black?

Various Australian Managed Funds (excluding "cross-investments") — superannuation (about 75% of the total),
public unit trusts&life insurance (about 25% of the total)
ABS Link: $2.3 trillion
$3.2 trillion in March 2021
$2.3 trillion
Gross: Overseas investors (in Australian currency)
DFAT Link: $3.2 trillion
$3.8 trillion in 2019 click here for a recent AFR article
 
less: Australian investors (in overseas currency)
DFAT Link: $2.2 trillion
$2.9 trillion in 2019
 
Nett from Overseas Investment
ABS Link: $1.0 trillion
$1.0 trillion
Leaving a balance, roughly, for banks and other investors in Australia to supply:$70 billion
Total:$3.37 trillion

Yep, we've relied hugely on overseas investment since 1788 — starting with those famous IOU's written in 1793 for 7,500 bottles of overseas rum, authorized by the British Regiment's Paymaster — but with so much now available in our own superannuation and insurance and trust funds, the percentage of nett overseas investment has actually dropped.

So, while Mr Abbott and Mr Hockey are doubtless wise in endeavouring to, very gradually, reduce the $300 billion owing in federal bonds, those other figures do help to bring it all into a better perspective, with all the shouting that's going on.

Thank you Lord, yes, to rest in you, to look to you, our loving heavenly Father, for each coming day's needs.

"give us day by day, the bread for each coming day" as several translations put it.

Blessings all :-) Steve